Skip to main content
Add Me To Your Mailing List
HomeVoter Registration

100 Years of Registering Voters

For 100 years, the League of Women Voters has been registering voters to make sure all citizens have an opportunity for their voices to be heard at the ballot box.

The League concentrates registration drives at locations that reach a large number of unregistered voters, including high schools and colleges, transit hubs and naturalization ceremonies.

If your organization would like to have League volunteers come to an event and offer voter registration

Click here to complete the form.


edited_edited_2016_Margie_464_1869780478.JPG

Register to Vote

Qualifications

  • United States Citizen, at least 17 1/2 years of age (18 years of age at election),
  • Resident of the jurisdiction in which you will be voting, 
  • Must not be adjudged incapacitated,
  • Prior felon must be off parole or probation.

Every eligible voter should have a fair and equal opportunity to register to vote and to cast their ballot. Some Americans miss the opportunity to vote because they don’t know how to register or they miss the deadline to register.

Your election board or county clerk's office is a great place check your voter registration status or to get started

MO Sec of State Registration

Your Voter Registration Form must be POSTMARKED by the 4th Wednesday before the election.


Need More Information?

Your local election board or county clerk is a great place to contact when you have questions. The links below will take you to the local election authorities in our area.



Kansas City (in Jackson County)

Jackson County (exc. Kansas City)

Cass County

Clay County   

Platte County

Check Your Registration:  Once you've registered, allow 2 weeks, then check your voter registration status using     Voter Look Up


Dates to Watch

Upcoming Events
Dates to Watch




Voting Information for College Students 

Absentee or mail-in voting is available to all Missouri voters in 2020.  For information on how this may affect you, visit the website's 
Absentee Voting page. 
 

If you are attending college away from home, you can still vote. Here are the answers to questions you may have. 


Where should I register to vote if I'm attending college away from home? 

College students who are attending school away from home have two options. 


One option is to register to vote where you are going to school.  Simply contact the local election authority - the election board or the county clerk -  to learn what you need to do.   If you are going to college in the Kansas City area, use the links above. 


You also have the option of maintaining your voter registration in your home town.


Where will I vote?

You will vote in the election jurisdiction where you registered.   If you decide to register with the election authority where you are attending school, you will vote at your assigned polling location in that locality.   If you are registered to vote in your home town, you may vote absentee.  Missouri allows absentee voting for individuals who will be absent from their voting jurisdiction on election day. 

How do I vote absentee? (Remember this takes planning on your part.)

First, request as absentee ballot from your election authority.   You may request an absentee ballot by mail up to ten (10) weeks before the election.  Your election authority will mail your ballot to you approximately six (6) weeks prior to the election.  Complete the ballot, have it notarized (you may want to check with your campus office and ask where on campus there is a notary available), and return it to the election authority.  Your ballot must be received by 7 pm on election day for it to be counted.  

How do I decide where to register to vote?

Many college students care about what’s going on in their home town as well as their college community.  But voters only get one vote.  So consider the issues and races that are important to you and where you want your vote to count. 

How do I check to see if  I’m registered to vote?

If you’re not sure where you’re registered to vote, click here  and enter the requested information.  

What should I do if I still have questions?

The local election authority is your best resource if you have questions. 
edited_Cent_Mich_1137332091.jpg


Accessible voting - curbside

Accessible Voting


The following are available for persons with limited mobility or physical or sensory disabilities.


Curbside Voting:  If you are unable to enter a polling location because of limited mobility, upon arrival at your polling location, you may request that an election judge bring a ballot to you. 
 

Accessible Polling Places: If you have a physical disability and your assigned polling location is not accessible to you, you may request an alternate polling location from your local election authority. 

Accessible Voting Systems:  Every polling location must have accessible voting systems available for people with sensory disabilities.  

Permanent Absentee Voting:  If you have a permanent disability, you may request an absentee ballot be mailed to you directly for each election.  You can return your completed ballot by mail.  You do not need to have your completed ballot notarized. 

For more information on Accessible Voting options, visit the Secretary of State's website.


 

Restoration of Voting Rights

Learn how to Restore your Voting Rights: If you have been convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor and you have been discharged from supervision, you may have your voting rights restored. 


If you are on supervision solely for a Suspended Impositions of Sentence (SIS), you are already able to vote because an SIS is not considered a conviction.  In Missouri, upon completion of a sentence, probation and/or parole, you are eligible to have your voting rights restored as long as your conviction was not associated with voting rights offenses.

To restore this right, you will need to have an official Letter of Discharge or other appropriate documentation from the Department of Corrections, and have updated your voter registration or completed a new registration application form.

You may register to vote at your Board of Election or County Clerk's office, the DMV or by mail.  Be sure to take the appropriate documentation with you when you visit any of these offices for the purpose of restoring your voting rights.
 

 

Restoration of Voting Rights

Learn how to Restore your Voting Rights: If you have been convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor and you have been discharged from supervision, you may have your voting rights restored. 


If you are on supervision solely for a Suspended Impositions of Sentence (SIS), you are already able to vote because an SIS is not considered a conviction.  In Missouri, upon completion of a sentence, probation and/or parole, you are eligible to have your voting rights restored as long as your conviction was not associated with voting rights offenses.

To restore this right, you will need to have an official Letter of Discharge or other appropriate documentation from the Department of Corrections, and have updated your voter registration or completed a new registration application form.

You may register to vote at your Board of Election or County Clerk's office, the DMV or by mail.  Be sure to take the appropriate documentation with you when you visit any of these offices for the purpose of restoring your voting rights.
 

 


Be Choosy About the Initiative Petitions You  Sign - Think Before You Ink

 

READ- Read the petition to understand what it is. 
- Initiative titles can sound like something you support, but in fact may not always give a full picture of what the initiative would do.
ASK- Ask the signature collector to tell you more about what this imitative will do.
- If you are still unclear, don't sign until you can get more information.
THINK- Think about whether or not this is something you support before you sign the petition to get it on the ballot.